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Call for Content

Thank you for your interest in submitting content for the PA GIS Conference! We are accepting submissions for oral, poster, and map presentations. This year's PA GIS Conference encourages proposal submissions to a variety of themed sessions (listed below). Should you have any questions or concerns, please email us a pagisconference@keystonegis.org.

For students, there will be a competition for poster and map submissions. More details will be provided soon. Stay tuned!

Submit Content

The deadline for submission is February 12th, 2023.

Session Themes

When submitting a proposal, you may choose to submit to a specific session theme, or you may elect to submit outside of the listed theme sessions.




SMART GIS
Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology (SMART) systems refers to the integration of computing and telecommunications technology to enhance the capabilities of systems that normally do not include such integrations. SMART Systems, such as GIS, are made ‘smart’ by their ability to communicate and work with networked technologies, and through its ability to allow automated or adaptive functionality as well as remote accessibility or operation from anywhere. Given that information is all around us, and is a natural extension of the 24-hour news cycle that started several decades ago, decision-makers have large amounts of data at their fingertips, including real time sensors, drone information, GPS data collections, and numerous other data sources. GIS helps organize this information into usable interfaces that allow for timely data-driven decisions.
This session invites proposals that focus on SMART Geographic Information Systems applied to a variety of context areas.

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GIS Management
This track is aimed towards helping GIS Managers. Whether you are a seasoned professional, or new to the role, presentations in this session will provide you some valuable insight and lessons learned from both the public and private sectors. We encourage the submission of abstracts for presentations highlighting methods and tactics used by GIS managers in public and private sectors.

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Water Utilities
Water utilities are challenged with increased regulatory reporting requirements regarding their field assets. GIS applications have enabled operators to meet these new challenges for data analysis,  field inspections, data management, quality control, outreach and regulatory reporting. The recent EPA Lead and Copper rule is just one example of how GIS has play the key role in the operations of water utilities by using or deploying Machine Learning, Survey123, the HUB, predictive analysis and Dashboards. The data management workflows require a unique approach to suite the challenges facing each operation. Submit your abstract andjoin this discussion at the PA GIS Conference to learn more about how communities in Pennsylvania are making GIS work for them in the water utilities space. 

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Community Service, Citizens Science, and Public Engagement
GIS has a long history of being used to create web mapping application to inform the public about different projects and community initiatives. But with the plethora of GIS web and mobile tools available to engage different sectors of the public, there are unique ways to collect geographic data from the public to help make decisions or further science. This data can come from municipality residents, to project volunteers, to citizen scientists, and anyone in between. We are seeking presentations that highlight the interface between the public and GIS data and applications. Submit your abstract and join this discussion at the PA GIS Conference to share how you are making GIS work for community service, citizens science, and public engagement.

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Public Safety & 911
Public Safety has been an early adopter of GIS technology since the end of last century.  GIS supports all facets of the Public Safety mission including: 9-1-1 dispatch and response to emergency planning for everything from events to mass casualty scenarios. GIS will be an integral part of Public Safety moving forward with Next Gen 9-1-1. The next generation of 9-1-1 will use GIS to make use of emerging technologies. This session is seeking proposals for presentations centered around the theme of Public Safety & 9-1-1.

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(Semi-)Automated Detection Algorithms
With increases in data resolution, size, and quantity, (semi-)automated methods provide more efficient feature detection and recognition capacity, and more reliable processing systems for interpreting “big data”.  This session brings together presentations on the newest research goals and advanced methods of detection, recognition, and characterization of features using a variety of datasets and for a variety of context areas. We invite contributions from those integrating (semi-)automated methods into their approach(es), with focuses on enhanced detection, recognition, and characterization of natural and anthropogenic features.

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GIS Programming & Development
Whether you are creating custom popups using Arcade, automating geoprocessing workflows with Python scripts or ModelBuilder, creating custom web mapping applications with JavaScript, or developing desktop GIS applications with .NET or Java, programming skills are essential to the GIS professional's toolkit. This session is for you to show off you latest technical tips and tricks or highlight your custom script or mapping application. Presentation will lean toward the technical side, but could also focus on how you overcame certain development or design obstacles. Submit your abstract and join this discussion at the PA GIS Conference to share how you are utilizing GIS programming and development in your everyday GIS use.

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Geophysical Applications
Geophysical data and GIS are tightly interconnected to one another. Geophysical data is a part of many fields that include: Earth Science, Mining, Archaeology, Seismology, Hydrology, Energy Exploration, Geology, Marine Science, and Engineering. Different kinds of sensors or geophysical technologies can be used to capture the data required for these fields, and this data supports the development of multi-dimensional (2D to 4D) techniques related to spatial analysis, visualization, and display. This session encourages the submission of abstracts for presentations related to geophysical (including geodetic) applications to solving problems or addressing needs in a variety of fields.

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Environmental Applications
The effects of human activity on the biophysical environment often lead to environmental and ecological degradation, impacting all spheres of the Earth. The most impacted zone is the ‘Critical Zone’; the environment where rock, soil, water, air, and living organisms interact and shape the Earth’s surface. Protecting our environment is an important concern for all of us, and we must monitor, manage, and study the continually changing environment and further understand its impact on a sustainable future with the Earth. Effective monitoring, management, and an improved understanding of the environment requires valuable information and data that can be extracted through the application of geospatial technologies such as remote sensing and GIS. This session is seeking remote sensing and GIS centered presentations on the science, monitoring, and management of Environmental issues within Pennsylvania.

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Accessibility, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
Over the last century, the geosciences (including the geospatial industry and sciences) have trailed other Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields in the recruitment, retention, and inclusion of a diverse workforce. Additionally, accessibility issues in the STEM fields have been poorly addressed for learners and workforce personnel. As of yet, the progress made has not led to equity at all career stages, nor has it led to increased participation by members of other underrepresented groups, particularly people of color. Multiple structural, institutional, and cultural barriers continue to restrict participation by such peoples in the geospatial fields. In the future, the need for skilled geoscientific and geospatial professionals will outpace supply if the associated workforce does not reflect national demographics. Meeting this need requires unique and visionary efforts to change institutional climates, remove barriers to participation, and prioritize the inclusion of persons who have largely been excluded during the last century. This session encourages the submission of abstracts for presentations that will highlight experiences, leadership, innovation, and solutions that are changing the landscape to promote and encourage diversity, inclusion, accessibility, and equity in the geoscientific and geospatial fields.

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